Press Release Detail
 
ART HAS A GREAT ROLE TO PLAY: PRESIDENT MAMNOON HUSSAIN
Dated: 3/25/2015
President Mamnoon Hussain has said that poets and writers can play a great role in promoting ethical and social values.  The president underscored that poets should highlight issues of corruption and character building of youth through their work.
The President said this while addressing the Mehfil-e-Mushaira held as part of Pakistan Day celebrations, at Aiwan-e-Sadr on Tuesday. Renowned poets from all across the country participated in the Mushaira.
On the occasion, poets read their poetry. Praising the poetry recitation of the poets, the President stated that the art should also be used as a vehicle of positive change and as a means to convey message for the betterment of society.
The President said that presently Pakistan is going through challenging times and terrorists have spared nobody and even targeted innocent children and women to further their hideous agenda. The President said that terrorists have complete disregard for religious places and sanctity of the home adding that dark forces are bent upon imposing their misguided ideology upon the people through force which has nothing to do with religion and ethics.
The President said that corruption erodes the very fabric of a society adding that the basic reasons behind corruption are greed and moral degradation. The President stated that Pakistan is blessed with enormous resources and called for better utilization of these resources for the growth and development of the country.
The President also underscored the importance of acquiring education and training of the youth noting that lack of proper training has resulted into the weakening of social and ethical values.
The President emphasized that under these circumstances, there is a need to give light of hope by doing away with the evils of terrorism, extremism, moral degradation and corruption. The thinkers, poets, philosophers and literary personalities can play a significant role in this regard, added the President.

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